Lene Tranberg – Futuna Lecture Series 2016

Tietgenkollegiet Student Residences

Danish architect Lene Tranberg will be delivering three lectures across New Zealand this March. Lene will talk about her architectural practise, highlighting her recent projects to demonstrate her approach, philosophy and influences.

Lene Tranberg has practiced in Copenhagen working in and managing the practice of Lundgaard and Tranberg formed in 1985. This is a significant and creative practice, which has authored some of the most important cultural projects in Europe. Winner of 5 RIBA European Awards, Danish Business Woman of the Year 2010, Knight of the Order of the Dannebrog and judge in international architectural competitions such as Mies van der Rohe Award (2015) and Stirling Prize Jury (2011). Through her work Lene has accrued significant and worthy international acclaim.

Auckland – 6.30pm Wednesday 16th March
Christchurch – 6.30pm Thursday 17th March
Wellington – 6.30pm Saturday 19th March

Get tickets here »

United States Speaking Tour

                          New York – Spring Street                                           The High Line

Recently I visited North America on a speaking tour for the university that spanned both coasts and a wide array of architecture. Two of the places I visited on the East Coast couldn’t have been more different – New Hampshire and New York – they perfectly illustrated my lectures on ‘genius loci’ and the meaning and prevailing atmosphere of a place.

New Hampshire Gothic

Architectural Engineering

As Architect in Residence at University of Canterbury, the inaugural delivery of my Masters Course on Integrated Design has now been completed. It was a pleasure to teach a class of highly motivated engineering post-grads.

We were also lucky to have so many professionals involved, giving guest lectures and participating in one of the assignments.

The course is being repeated in the first semester 2016 with enrolments now open.

More information »

What if… buying a house became more affordable?

  • What if housing was more affordable?
  • What if housing solutions were more achievable?
  • What if architects and engineers could contribute creatively to the supply of housing, and at the same time, improve the environment?
The affordability of housing has featured in news headlines consistently throughout the year. But, despite the high media profile, few satisfactory answers have been offered and the dream of owning a home has, for many New Zealanders, been pushed further and further beyond reach.

But is owning a single family unit on a single piece of land the appropriate goal for all New Zealanders to aspire to at this point in the 21st century? Is this crisis really an opportunity to rethink the nation’s goals not just in terms of housing but in terms of all the environmental and social factors that are present alongside housing? With an unprecedented demand to develop new homes in the Auckland region, and the complex housing requirements of Christchurch’s rebuild, surely this point in time can be seen as not a crisis but a strategic opportunity for New Zealanders to address the way we design, build and invest in houses.

As part of my role as Architect in Residence, Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering at the University of Canterbury I presented a lecture in September 2015 examining the crisis as portrayed in the media and investigated ways architects have responded to this urgent need, drawing on local and overseas examples.

Futuna Lecture Series, 25-29 March 2015

In the latest Futuna Lecture Series, Chilean architect Alejandro Aravena will be giving three public lectures in New Zealand (Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington) this month, speaking about his work and the philosophy that underpins his architectural practice.

Aravena has practiced in Santiago, Chile since 1994. ELEMENTAL, his practice, is a “do-tank” that, in partnership with the Chilean Oil Company COPEC and Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, develops housing and infrastructural projects with public interest and social impact. He is internationally admired for his work with ‘incremental’ housing. As well as having a strong social focus, his architecture has been described as essential and rigorous in the way real materials are used. “Exposed concrete, wood, glass, steel, masonry, copper and stone are composed, coupled, and superimposed, achieving aesthetic, functional and formal solutions that are strongly original”. 

The Futuna Series focuses on international architects who have built a strong design reputation in architecture and urbanism. Last year, Niall McLaughlin’s lecture was inspiring. Aravena is bound to lift the bar with material just as topical, especially in his approach to social housing.

Limited tickets available at www.dashtickets.co.nz

www.alejandroaravena.com

Aravena Alejandro Architect Lecture