NZIA Canterbury Quick Fire Presentation Series August 2016

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Five local branch members from the NZIA, including yours truly, presented the ideas behind their own homes, which are in various stages of design/construction/completion recently to an excellent turn out at the NZIA Christchurch Branch rooms in the central city.

Presentations provided plenty of insights into tricky sites, post-earthquake considerations, budgets, influences, materials and final outcomes.

Presenters were
– Tim Nees (me) presenting the design for my home on Scarborough Hill, consented and ready for construction.
– Dan Sullivan presenting his parent’s recent award winning home he designed, ‘Ophir’ in Redcliffs.
– Mike Callaghan presenting his own small home in Huntsbury, was sort-of finished late 2014.
– Maria Chen presenting the design for her own townhouses on a back section in Sydenham, has just been granted resource consent.
– Michael O’Sullivan presenting his award-winning Lyttelton Studio Retreat, he designed and built himself.

NZIA Canterbury are aiming to make this a regular event so if you would like to be involved next time with your own home please let me know.

Private Cellar and Cinema

Here’s one from our archives. A private entertainment facility on the outskirts of Martinborough, built in 2006. Featuring a cellar with recycled brick vaults and a cinema with leather wall panels, contrasted against a plastered interior with recycled timber posts and beams. The exterior is concrete blockwork construction with stone cladding. Thanks to Justin Wright and Earl Rutherford who worked on this project.

Seeking New Projects for 2016

 

Titahi Bay House, Porirua, Wellington  outdoor living space  NZIA Local Award for Architecture  photographer Simon Devitt

Titahi Bay House, Porirua, Wellington outdoor living space NZIA Local Award for Architecture photographer Simon Devitt

Are you considering a new commercial or residential build in 2016? Our studio collaborates with clients who prefer engaging architecture that enriches cultural and physical space and enhances people’s lives.

We have worked on solutions from small baches and cribs to multi-housing and large business projects.

Referrals would be greatly appreciated so please spread the word or contact us directly to discuss your plans.

Contact us »

Work in Progress: Taylor’s Mistake House

Taylors Mistake

A sneak preview. A vessel ‘beached’ on a ledge above Taylor’s Mistake Bay. A twin timber hull, boards cladding both roof and walls. A small interior courtyard. Carefully detailed cabinetry the contents of the vessel. These are some of the ideas contained in this new house at Taylor’s Mistake.

It is a closed-form design, where plan, section and detail use a language of containment. Materials are expressed as wholes, not as parts.

 

Work in Progress: Kenepuru Cabin

Kenepuru Bach

A conceptual approach opposite to the Taylor’s Mistake House has been used at Kenepuru.

Here a tiny cabin opens out into the landscape. Materials extend past one another and overlap, building up a rich construction language.

The surrounding deck is considerably larger than the cabin itself; bearers, joists, beams and rafters carry out past the walls of the building proper. Individual elements are layered and repeated, each joist, each board given autonomy.

Some 3D renderings of the design.

Kenepuru2        Kenepuru1

Nees Appointed Canterbury University’s Architect in Residence

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Some information about my new role in the Engineering Department at the University of Canterbury, where I am currently the Architect in Residence.


The University of Canterbury has appointed Christchurch architect Tim Nees as the inaugural Architect in Residence within its College of Engineering.

The residency has support from Sir Miles Warren’s Warren Architects Education Charitable Trust and from former graduate Jim Rutherford. Professor Mark Davidson, head of civil and natural resources engineering, says the trust and Rutherford have been crucial in creating the new position.

“The Architect in Residence will provide a catalyst for developing more systematic and effective interaction between the architectural and engineering professions. More specifically, this unique initiative will provide important opportunities to broaden the education of our engineering students in an architectural context.

“The residency will also contribute to our education and research activities in earthquake engineering at the postgraduate level, where UC has considerable expertise and there is a need to further develop that specialist expertise in an architectural context,’’ Professor Davidson says.

Nees is one of New Zealand’s highly respected architects and a Fellow of the New Zealand Institute of Architects (NZIA). He was apprenticed to Ian Athfield at Athfield Architects in the 1980s. His work has won 20 NZIA Awards for Excellence in Architecture, including the top national award. Nees is a senior design architect on a wide range of commercial and residential projects in Christchurch, Dunedin and Wellington.

“This is an honour to be the first architect in residence at the university at an exciting time of the Christchurch rebuild. Some of the world’s great cities have at some stage been rebuilt following significant disasters. They wouldn’t be the cities they are today had disaster not once struck them down,’’ Nees says.

“The great Fire of London enabled Christopher Wren to build St Paul’s Cathedral. Lisbon gained an elegant neo-classical city centre after their 18th century earthquake and deluge. Tokyo has been rebuilt several times following earthquakes and fires. Napier has become known as New Zealand’s charming art deco city, after the devastating 1930s earthquake. What most of these rebuilds achieved was a consistency of urban space and urban fabric.

“Christchurch’s rebuild should be less a discussion about architectural style and more a discussion about consistency and the quality of urban space. If the city can support a vibrant city life and provide spaces where people want to be, the built backdrop becomes less important.

“It is when the design of city buildings is unsympathetic or intrusive and negatively affects the quality of urban life – whether that is due to the way the building relates to the spaces around it, or the way it affects views and wind and sun – that the urban quality is reduced.

“Riverside walks, lane ways and squares, the way cars are routed through the city – if these things are done well then a building’s integration in the street is more important than its individual style. One would hope that, in time, the buildings that are being built will relate well to the city they are making and achieve an overall consistency of city fabric. But this needn’t be a consistency of style. Urban environments can be enriched by the unexpected.

“There are unprecedented opportunities in Christchurch, though the ride has been bumpy. It’s not only unfair, but unwise, to expect the process to be fast. Cities evolve through time. Yet it is exciting watching buildings going up in Victoria Street and Durham Street, and realise that this is a complete new city fabric unfolding.’’

Resene Architecture and Design Film Festival 2015

With New Zealand almost into the icy grip of winter it’s also film festival time. This year Resene is working with Rialto Cinemas and Clearly & Co to bring us the fourth Resene Architecture and Design Film Festival.

The movies are divided into four separate spheres: Architectural Perspectives, Design Inspiration, Experiments in Space, and Greenscapes.

My must-see picks for this year are screenings of two Sir Ian Athfield movies: Architect of Dreams directed by Geoffrey Cawthorn and Architect Athfield directed by Sam Neill.

The festival is screening in three New Zealand locations:

Wellington – The Embassy Theatre – 28 May – 10 Jun 2015

Dunedin – Rialto Cinemas Dunedin – 11 Jun – 21 Jun 2015

Christchurch – Academy Gold – 25 Jun – 8 Jul 2015

Download the festival programme here »

Visit the festival website here »

 

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Futuna Lecture Series, 25-29 March 2015

In the latest Futuna Lecture Series, Chilean architect Alejandro Aravena will be giving three public lectures in New Zealand (Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington) this month, speaking about his work and the philosophy that underpins his architectural practice.

Aravena has practiced in Santiago, Chile since 1994. ELEMENTAL, his practice, is a “do-tank” that, in partnership with the Chilean Oil Company COPEC and Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, develops housing and infrastructural projects with public interest and social impact. He is internationally admired for his work with ‘incremental’ housing. As well as having a strong social focus, his architecture has been described as essential and rigorous in the way real materials are used. “Exposed concrete, wood, glass, steel, masonry, copper and stone are composed, coupled, and superimposed, achieving aesthetic, functional and formal solutions that are strongly original”. 

The Futuna Series focuses on international architects who have built a strong design reputation in architecture and urbanism. Last year, Niall McLaughlin’s lecture was inspiring. Aravena is bound to lift the bar with material just as topical, especially in his approach to social housing.

Limited tickets available at www.dashtickets.co.nz

www.alejandroaravena.com

Aravena Alejandro Architect Lecture

Kenepuru Sound Model

New Zealand’s Next Top Model

Over the weekend, I built a model of a small house for a property in Kenepuru Sound. The first model I’ve made for probably 15 years. And the first house I’ve designed with a curved roof – a request from the client, though I think it works fine.

I’m looking forward to this tiny building being built. Does 50m2 qualify for being a micro-house? Though with decks and roof overhangs, it grows to a more substantial 165m2.

But wouldn’t it be nice to prefabricate the whole thing and float it on a barge from Picton to the site? Aldo Rossi did something similar in Venice last century, as part of a Biennale. There’s something cinematically romantic about such an idea.

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Kenepuru Sound Model